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Black Box Edition Guns

black box edition glock

We do guns for customers. It’s what we do. Take their idea of how they want their gun to look and make it a reality. And we love it. But recently, we decided we want to do some guns the way WE want them. And the “Black Box Edition” line was born.

We take a new gun, add stippling, cerakote, optic, maybe a new slide, whatever makes it a truly custom, one off piece that will live up to the Schiwerks name. Then we put it in a black box with laser cut foam and a laser engraved brass coin with it’s Black Box serial number and then offer it to our customers.

These will be extremely limited numbers. We figure anywhere from six to a dozen a year. Keep your eye out for these, we’ll push them out on social media and email when they drop. See if you can get your hands on one of these extremely limited edition firearms.

~Sam

Return To Schiwerks Media


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Custom Cerakoted Revolvers

Cerakote Revolvers

Chad Groepper was a local soldier. In fact, Sam went to school with him. He was killed in Iraq back in 2008 in service to our country. His family started a memorial golf benefit to help provide for this wife and child he left behind. It’s been going strong ever since, and has moved to benefitting worthy causes around the community.

For the last 5 years we’ve been donating a gun to the auction. Our awesome customers help donate the gun, then we donate the cerakote work. We were lucky enough to have one amazing donor who wanted to cover an additional gun, so we were able to donate 2. We used Taurus Tracker 357 Mag Revolvers. We removed the branding and engraved it with Chad’s information and “All Gave Some, Some Gave All.” We were super pleased how these turned out and the response on the auction to them. Thanks to Ballistic Imagery for the amazing photos as usual.

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Boondocks Desert Eagle

Boondocks Saints Desert Eagle

Boondocks Saints is one of those movies with a cult following, so we weren’t surprised when someone wanted a gun done. And a Desert Eagle was just perfect for the job.

First, we disassembled the entire gun, as usual. But then we threw it under the laser and deep engraved some Irish scrollwork and wording on the frame, slide and barrel. Next we blasted it all, and applied some Titanium Cerakote in our battleworn style. And lastly, we engraved a cross on the front strap, as well as the prayer from the movie on top of the slide to really stand out in that white.

All in all, this turned our amazing and we’re extremely happy with it. As usual, Ballistic Imagery’s photography really brings it to life. What do you guys think, did we do the movie justice with this build?

~Sam

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Spike’s Warthog & Samurai

Spikes Tactical Warthog Receiver

Spike’s Tactical is one of the companies putting out these awesome face lowers.

They’re extremely popular, especially in the cerakote industry. There have been countless cerakote jobs put on them, but we like to think ours is a bit different from all the rest. We spent a lot of time on the details of this and are extremely happy how they came out.

What do you guys think? How’d we do?

As usual, props to Ballistic Imagery for the photos.

~Sam

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Cordless hole puncher??

milwaukee glock

A lot of what we do for our customers is bring their ideas to life.

So many of our customers work with a specific product and want that conveyed in the artwork on their firearm. This is what we specialize in.

This particular Glock was the perfect canvas for the job, and with Cerakote, laser stippling, frame undercut, memory cut, horn removal, and a custom backplate, this custom piece turned out amazing.

And of course, the photography by Ballistic Imagery certainly helps.

Sam
Schiwerks

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Gun Control on the Move in Congress. We Need to Act

New gun control bills have passed the House and have been sent to the Senate.

HR8 and HR1446 have bipartisan support and have a real chance of passing. They would effectively make you a felon for loaning or selling a gun to a friend without a background check, and possibly even for HANDING a gun to a friend. Also allows the government to deny your right to purchase a firearm for up to 30 days.

We need to be acting on these immediately. The gun community for too long has depended on ‘someone else’ to take care of it for us. This is no longer an option, as there’s a very real chance these will pass and makes felons out of law abiding citizens.

Contact your Senators now and often! Join 2nd amendment rights groups! Below is a link to the Firearms Policy Coalition to help you make your voice heard. DO NOT assume someone else will take care of this guys. We need all the help we can get!
~Sam

Firearms Policy Coalition Take Action Form

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Patina Bronze Overthrow Set

Rainier Arms Overthrow
Rainier Arms Overthrow

Recently got the opportunity to cerakote a Rainier Arms Overthrow AR set. These are really cool designed AR lowers, machined to look like an old knight’s or crusader’s metal helmet. The customer just told us he wanted it to look old and worn and gave us free reign to make it look awesome. (We love getting free reign.)

Well it definitely turned out bad ass, so we had Ballistic Imagery come in a snap some pictures for us. Let us know what you guys think and leave a comment below!

Check out more work by Ballistic Imagery on his website or Facebook page.

Look at our other projects in our Gallery.

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Life’s Short, Live Free is in Podcast form!

So we just recorded our fifth episode which will be out this week and we’re now an actual podcast!  We’ve been published on iTunes, Google Music, Stitcher, and Spotify as well as Podbean.  If you listen somewhere else, let us know and we’ll get it put up on that platform as well.

Google Music

iTunes

Stitcher

Spotify

Podbean

 

 

Check it out, subscribe and share, and let us know what you think!  Feel free to give us a shout with any topics you’d like to hear us talk about.

Sam

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Life’s Short Live Free Podcast

We’ve started a video podcast.  Uploaded every other Thursday on Youtube, and will be up on major podcast apps soon.  It’s about everything Freedom, and of course with a heavy dose of firearms.  Whiskey, cars, hunting, anything associated with Freedom.  Check it out!

We’re learning as we go, the audio will be improving with every episode. so bear with us.

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Why gun owners are ‘shooting themselves in the foot’ by supporting the bump stock ban

 

Any gun owner that’s spent time on gun forums or Facebook gun groups knows that gun owners are split over the bump stock ban.  Half of them respond with “bump stocks are stupid anyways, who cares,” and the other half are pretty sure it’s the end of the 2nd amendment as we know it.  The truth?  Probably somewhere in the middle.

Let’s be honest.  Are bump stocks useful for personal defense, target shooting, or hunting?  No.  But that’s not the point.  No one is claiming they are.  The reason anyone is upset about it is the ATF is claiming they are machine guns.  So, let’s examine what a machine gun actually is, according to the parameters set by Congress.

The National Firearms Act of 1934 regulated machine guns and defined them as “any weapon which shoots, is designed to shoot, or can be readily restored to shoot, automatically more than one shot, without manual reloading, by a single function of the trigger.”  Meaning, you pull the trigger ONCE, and it fires continuously until the trigger is released, or the magazine is depleted.

The ATF’s latest stance on bump stocks is that a bump stock works with a single function of the trigger.  But that is outrageously false.  And flies in the face of the Obama Administration’s ATF entire reasoning to approve them in the first place.  They acknowledged that the trigger is still pulled and reset every time a shot is fired.  It is a still a semi automatic weapon.  This video, courtesy of The Gun Collective, clearly demonstrates that.

So, it’s pretty clear that a bump stock does NOT convert a semi automatic firearm to fully automatic according to the laws passed by Congress, and the ATF is using its own definition.  Is that a problem?  Absolutely, for several reasons.

You don’t need a bump stock to bump fire.  It’s nothing new, has been around for years, and anyone with a little time to practice can reproduce the rate of full auto fire by ‘bumping’ the trigger.  So, since a bump stock only aids in bump firing, and is now considered a machine gun, wouldn’t anything that aids in firing quicker fall under that category as well?  Triggers with lighter pull weights, lightened bolt carriers, adjustable gas blocks, etc.  Technically, these things could aid in firing quicker, or bump firing, and would therefore fall under the machine gun category?  Far fetched?  Yes, but under an extremely anti gun administration, not so much.  We’ve seen how far they’ll go.  (Remember the SAFE Act in New York, where you could possess ten round magazines but only load 7 rounds in them?)

Second, remember it said “or can be readily restored to shoot, automatically more than one shot” in the definition of a machine gun?  “Readily restored to be a machine gun,” in other words.  Since installing a bump stock on an AR15 takes only a few minutes, or even installing a trigger that would aid in bump firing(remember, that falls under machine guns now) would definitely fall under readily or easily restored to a machine gun, any anti gun administration could use the same powers used to ban stocks, that half of gun owners are cheering, to ban entire categories of weapons.

Far too many gun owners just say ‘well we gotta give em something, give em bump stocks’ as that’s going to satisfy them.  Why compromise?  We’ve given far too much already that we’ll never get back.  And giving in on this issue that could become a massive problem next time an anti gun administration is in office is foolish.   Truly shooting ourselves in the foot.

 

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5 Police officers killed in the line of duty last week

Officers Eric Joering and Anthony Morelli were the latest officers shot and killed in the line of duty while responding to a 911 hangup call.

 

(2-11-2018) Every day when officers put on those colors and badge, they know they’re putting their life on the line.  All of those lost this week leave behind a wife and kids.  You’re all in our prayers and your sacrifice will never be forgotten.  God bless you.   And to all those officers still in the line of duty, be safe.  We got your back.

 

2 officers shot and killed after responding to 911 hang up call.  RIP Eric Joering and Anthony Morelli

3 law enforcment officers shot, one killed.  RIP Locust Grove police Officer Chase Maddox

1 officer shot and killed.  RIP Officer David Sherrard.

2 officers shot one of them killed.  RIP El Paso County sheriff’s Deputy Micah Flick.

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Craftsmanship: Woodworking, Kydex, Cerakote, And What Drives Us.

holster wallet
Over the past five generations, this family’s style of craftsmanship has changed. But the quality has always been there, and always will be.

The Schiwerks Way

(1/28/2018) – First things first, thank you thank you thank you for being interested enough in our company to click on this. We’ve worked hard and come a long way, and along that way, every single person that’s “liked”, “shared”, bought, or commented on any one thing that we’ve done has meant more to us than you’ll ever realize. In today’s world of Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, etc., you would think building a website and driving enough traffic to it to generate an income wouldn’t be all that hard. But I’ll tell ya right now, it has not been easy. It has been hard, it has been frustrating, and at times, even a little maddening. We’re not even close to achieving what we know we can, and without you, none of it is even possible. So, sincerely, thank you.

Now, to the reason I’m writing this. We want you to know who we are. What we stand for. Why we’re “different”.

If you’ve had any interest in us prior to this point, you’ve probably figured out that this company consists of Sam, the owner, and myself, Jesse. We’re a couple of brothers who are probably more alike than we’d like to be.

Growing up, we spent a lot of time in Dad’s wood shop. And he did the same with his dad. Four generations of this before us. Somehow, in a town of less than 400 people, he managed to make a living and provide for Mom and their four children. A woodworker. In a town of less than 400. And he made it work. Churning out some of the best damn woodworking you’ll ever see. Hell, his projects have even made the newspaper! It was a horse-drawn hearse, and it was frickin’ impressive. He’s the purest definition of a craftsman.

Sam and I, while we did “dabble” in wordworking a little bit, it just wasn’t for us. Out of high school, Sam went to college for collision repair and mechanics. Up until January 1, 2018 that has been his life.

I don’t know how much you know about automotive paint. But it can be a real pain in the ass. Now, we’ve both been doing it long enough where it just kind of comes naturally, it’s not really something we have to think about. Of course, there are still times when we’ll get our ass kicked by color-matching a white pearl tri-coat, but that’s a whole different story.

What we’ve developed an eye for throughout the years are tiny little imperfections. Imperfections that most people would never notice, or if they did notice, probably wouldn’t even care about. Not only did we develop an eye for these things, we both grew to REALLY hate having an imperfection in our paint. We both know we can create a perfect finish with relative ease. So why let that one little thing fly?

Body work and paint translates perfectly to what both of us do. For Sam, cerakote is just another day in the shop.

Myself, I was kind of a computer guy. I decided to go to college for Computer Aided Drafting. Sam was working in Kansas City, and I had just been accepted down there. A few hours after I graduated high school, I drove down there and moved in with him. That went….poorly, to say the least, and before I even started school, I moved back home and started working construction.

After about a year of that, we were on vacation, and I still had no idea what I was doing with my life. We were sitting on a dock at the Lake of the Ozarks, and my oldest brother said, “Well, why not do what Sam does?”

Yeah, why not? I’d had an interest in cars before, I had just never really thought of it. A couple months later, I was done working construction, and I’ve kind of been unintentionally following Sam’s footsteps ever since.

I’ve been doing collision work now for eight years. I loved it, for a long time. And I probably will for a long time to come. But at this point, I need a challenge. I need a change. I need something bigger, something that matters. I can’t speak for Sam, or why he chose to start Schiwerks. But I do know that he is passionate about what he does, and that neither of us will quit until we succeed.

At first, making holsters was just a nice change of pace from the monotony of beating out dents. A nice hobby. Then Sam asked if I’d like to sell them under Schiwerks. There’s the challenge. An even bigger challenge: helping him create a brand that can make a difference.

Although expert craftsmanship has been in our blood for five generations now, and we’ve both learned to be maybe a little bit over-critical of our work from our time as body-men, giving you a superb product isn’t our lone top priority.

We put everything we have into our products. Our time, our money, and on multiple occasions I’ve put quite a bit of blood into it, never cried though. Man stuff, ya know. And when we’re done putting in, we put out. Err….donate. Sorry.

We recognize that without our military, we wouldn’t be where we are, doing what we’re doing. We aim to give back to those who deserve it most. To support those who defend us. Who’ve literally given their everything.

We’re just a couple of freedom-loving brothers, and we’re just getting started. Just wait until you see what we can do.